St. Edith, Orton on the Hill

St. Edith, Orton on the Hill

This church dates from the 12th/13th century, with a spire that was rebuilt in 1797 after the original was damaged by lightning. It occupies an elevated site with views over the West Leicestershire/North Warwickshire countryside. It is one of the most westerly located churches in Leicestershire

All Saints, Newtown Linford

All Saints, Newtown Linford

An attractively located church, bordering Bradgate Park, the ancient home of the Grey family, in the pleasant village of Newtown Linford. It is constructed of local stone and the original building is believed to date from the 14th century. It was considerably extended in the 19th century with the addition of the north aisle and the chancel. The lych gate is a relatively recent addition, being constructed in 1921.

All Saints, Newtown Linford

All Saints, Newtown Linford

The Royal Arms of George 1 are displayed on the chancel beam accompanied by shields displaying the arms of the Earls of Stamford, the title held by the Grey family. The colourful stained glass east window was installed in 1915 as a memorial to Lady Jane Grey of Bradgate, Queen of England for 9 days in the mid-16th century. Attractive oak panels provide a backdrop to the altar, beneath the east window.

United Baptist Church, Leicester

United Baptist Church, Leicester

This magnificent building lies somewhat unnoticed, amongst more modern buildings, in the centre of Leicester. It was designed in a classical style by the architect Joseph Aloysius Hansom, creator of the original Hansom Cab, and erected in 1845. Sadly it no longer functions as a church being declared redundant in 1939. It became part of the Leicester College of Adult Education in 1950.

St. Mary Magdalene, Peckleton

St. Mary Magdalene, Peckleton

A large church serving a small village. Dating from the 14th century, it underwent major restoration in the mid-19th century.

Higham on the Hill Methodist Church

Higham on the Hill Methodist Church

A small unobtrusive church in the pleasant village of Higham on the Hill.

St. Mary the Virgin, Wigston Parva

St. Mary the Virgin, Wigston Parva

A tiny chapel in the tiny hamlet of Wigston Parva, totally unobserved by those unaware of its existence. It is linked with the larger parish at nearby Sharnford. The chapel consists of one simple room with little ground. Burials were at neighbouring churches.

St. Mary the Virgin, Wigston Parva

St. Mary the Virgin, Wigston Parva

This is a listed building dating from the 11th century with phases of rebuilding over the centuries. There is a stained glass east window.

St. Mary's, Cotesbach

St. Mary's, Cotesbach

This church in the now peaceful village of Cotesbach is thought to date back to the 11th century. It has been subject to rebuilding and extension since then but the exposed rendering shows some of the early rubble construction of the tower.

St. Mary's, Cotesbach

St. Mary's, Cotesbach

The Marriott family bought the patronage of the church together with surrounding land in the mid-18th century. The east window commemorates 3 members of the Marriott family killed in World War One.

St. Peter, Aston Flamville

St. Peter, Aston Flamville

The present church is a rebuild of 1873, replacing a medieval church on the site. It is now linked to the larger church of St. Catherine in nearby Burbage. It is significant for a humble grave in the churchyard - the last resting place of Father Matthew Norton, a Roman Catholic priest who played a major part in the revival of the Dominican Order in England.

Headstone, Aston Flamville

Headstone, Aston Flamville

The headstone for the grave of Father Matthew Thomas Norton. He arrived in the area from France and re-established the Roman Catholic Church in nearby Hinckley in the mid-18th century. He also served Coventry and Leicester, travelling between the towns on foot. He was supported in his ministry by the Turville family of Aston Flamville who had previously provided priest holes in the Manor House in the village.

Thurlaston Chapel

Thurlaston Chapel

Former Baptist Chapel, first erected in 1781 and rebuilt in 1842. It now operates as an Evangelical Free Church.

Wigston United Reformed Church

Wigston United Reformed Church

The original chapel was built here in 1731 and the present classical style building dates from 1841. Although on a busy road, it has a pleasant setting next to Wigston Peace Park.

St Matthew, Normanton, Rutland Water

St Matthew, Normanton, Rutland Water

It may not actually be in Leicestershire but the beautiful design deserves a place on this site. This church is on the edge of Rutland Water and was preserved when the reservoir was constructed, by the building of a barrier of rocks around it. This has meant that the level of the ground surrounding the church has been raised. Formerly the local church for the tiny village of Normanton in Rutland, St. Matthew now serves as a museum, with displays covering the ecology and history of the area.

Stoney Stanton Methodist Chapel

Stoney Stanton Methodist Chapel

A small chapel, almost improbably squeezed between rows of terraced houses.

Staunton Harold

Staunton Harold

Staunton Harold Hall and Church occupy a delightful setting in a valley alongside an ornamental lake. The Church is notable for being one of a very few built during the Commonwealth period when the Puritan Oliver Cromwell ruled England.

Stapleton Methodist Chapel

Stapleton Methodist Chapel

Snibston, St. Mary

Snibston, St. Mary

An ancient church serving the once isolated community of Snibston. The expansion of coal mining locally led to the development of the nearby town of Coalville which now dominates this once rural area.

Hinckley, Great Meeting URC

Hinckley, Great Meeting URC

Dating from 1722, this chapel has served the cause of non-conformity longer than any other chapel in the area and continues to thrive. For many years it had close links with the Atkins family, whose nearby hosiery manufacturing business survived until the late 20th century. It was also the chapel of many of the other employers and employees engaged in the hosiery and knitwear trades.

Hinckley, Great Meeting URC

Hinckley, Great Meeting URC

Dating from 1722, this chapel has served the cause of non-conformity longer than any other chapel in the area and continues to thrive. For many years it had close links with the Atkins family, whose nearby hosiery manufacturing business survived until the late 20th century. It was also the chapel of many of the other employers and employees engaged in the hosiery and knitwear trades.

Elmesthorpe, St. Mary

Elmesthorpe, St. Mary

This church suffered a collapse of the roof of the west end of the nave. Repair was too costly so the congregation is now condensed into half of the original church.

Elmesthorpe, St. Mary

Elmesthorpe, St. Mary

Coleorton Methodist Chapel

Coleorton Methodist Chapel

Cadeby, All Saints

Cadeby, All Saints

This lovely little church, situated in the peaceful hamlet of Cadeby, is most famously known for being the site of the Cadeby Light Railway, created by the Rector of the parish, the late Revd. Teddy Boston. He was a friend of the creator of Thomas the Tank Engine, the Revd. W Awdry and provided the inspiration for The Fat Controller.

Cadeby, All Saints

Cadeby, All Saints

Breedon, St. Mary & St. Hardulph

Breedon, St. Mary & St. Hardulph

This large church, with its unusual dedication, stands proudly and prominently on an outcrop of rock forming the hill at Breedon. Whilst large parts of the hill have disappeared through quarrying operations the church remains accessible and the hill provides a vantage point for scenic views for miles around.

Breedon, St. Mary & St. Hardulph

Breedon, St. Mary & St. Hardulph

The basis of the church is a former Priory Church which served an Augustinian Priory from the 12th century. There are many monuments to the Shirley family, who purchased the church from Henry VIII for use as a burial place.

Barton in the Beans Baptist Chapel

Barton in the Beans Baptist Chapel

A large chapel constructed in 1841, replacing an older chapel on the site. The original chapel had close links with Samuel Deacon, a renowned clockmaker from the village.

Bagworth, Holy Rood

Bagworth, Holy Rood

A rare example of a contemporary Church of England construction. It was built in the 1960s to replace an earlier church that had been affected by mining subsidence.

Sutton Cheney, St. James

Sutton Cheney, St. James

This pleasant little church, in the village of Sutton Cheney, is popularly known as the church of Richard III. It is claimed that he prayed in the church on the eve of the fateful battle at nearby Bosworth Field in 1485. The church serves as a place of pilgrimage for members of the Richard III Society who believe that the last of the Plantagenet kings has been unfairly pilloried in history with many of the claims against him being written by the victors at Bosworth Field - the Tudors.

St. Peter's, Braunstone

St. Peter's, Braunstone

A 12th century building situated amongst modern and mid-20th century housing developments, the Church of St. Peter stands out as a reminder of a simple way of life which has now been lost, as the city of Leicester has expanded and swallowed up the surrounding villages. There are a few remaining old buildings along the main road through Braunstone including some old farm workers cottages, providing another reminder of a rural past. The village of Braunstone dates from Saxon times.

Bardon Park Chapel

Bardon Park Chapel

Believed to be one of the oldest non-conformist institutions in Leicestershire, the chapel dates from around 1694 though it was altered in 1830 and further subject to remodelling in 1877. There were further alterations around the beginning of the 20th century. The main construction is of rubble. The building is Grade II listed. It is believed to have originated as a Presbyterian place of worship but is now used for both URC and Christian Fellowship congregations.

Bardon Park Chapel Notice

Bardon Park Chapel Notice

St. James the Greater, Dadlington

St. James the Greater, Dadlington

A simple, yet picturesque, church situated next to the village green of Dadlington. The building mainly dates from a restoration of 1887-1890. It is reputed that the churchyard provides the last resting place of some of the combatants killed at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.

St. James the Greater, Dadlington

St. James the Greater, Dadlington

Hinckley Baptist Church

Hinckley Baptist Church

Hinckley Methodist Church

Hinckley Methodist Church

A Victorian building with a sympathetic modern extension.

Hinckley United Reformed Church

Hinckley United Reformed Church

A prominent, well-preserved, chapel, of neo-classical design, situated in a main thoroughfare. Designed by Drake of Leicester, construction was completed in 1868, replacing an earlier chapel nearby which the congregation had outgrown. The congregation was originally Independent, later Congregational and from 1973 part of the United Reformed Church. This present chapel was formally opened in 1868 by the Rev. R. W. Dale, a noted Congregational Minister in Birmingham.

Newton Burgoland Congregational

Newton Burgoland Congregational

A small chapel set in a row of cottages in a picturesque location. The church was established in the village in 1790, with the present buiding dating from the beginning of the 19th century.

St. Bartholomew, Foston

St. Bartholomew, Foston

The isolated church, serving a widespread rural congregation, has its origins in the 10th century. The village of Foston was deserted by 1622 after the land was enclosed by the local squire, depriving the villagers of their livelihood.

St. Bartholomew, Foston

St. Bartholomew, Foston

St. Bartholomew, Foston

St. Bartholomew, Foston

St. Peter's, Higham on the Hill

St. Peter's, Higham on the Hill

St. Peter's has a long association with the Fisher family who were Rectors here for many years. Their most famous member was Geoffrey Fisher. He was brought up at the local Rectory, with his father, Henry, being the Rector of the Parish for 40 years. In 1945 Geoffrey was appointed the 99th Archbishop of Canterbury. He served in this position until his retirement in 1961, officiating at the marriage of Princess Elizabeth and her later coronation as Queen Elizabeth II.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Heather

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Heather

A typical chapel building found in small communities. Now converted to residential use.

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